May 27th: Rachel Carson!

This morning, I woke up to find yet another female-focused Doodle on Google’s homepage. Today’s honoree is environmentalist, advocate, biologist, and author Rachel Carson. Born on this date in 1907, Carson’s efforts are credited with spurring action in the U.S. environmental and conservation movement, earning her a posthumous Presidential Medal of Freedom.

The Google Doodle honoring Rachel Carson, posted on May 27th, 2014.

The Google Doodle honoring Rachel Carson, posted on May 27th, 2014.

My friend and colleague Elizabeth Rogers wrote about Rachel Carson for this blog back in the summer of 2012. For today’s post, I’ll point you to that earlier missive on Carson’s achievements and legacy; those words serve as an even more fitting tribute now that Google has seen fit to honor Rachel Carson.

Midpoint Series: Thanks & a Major Milestone

This Speaking Up post is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

The week that marks the halfway point in the year, and the 2012 Midpoint Series along with it, has come to an end.

Thank you to all of the amazing guest bloggers and contributors to the series, who made this effort possible. Thank you also to everyone who helped me spread this message through your tweets, Facebook posts, and emails, and welcome to all of the new readers who have joined us this week. I hope you’ll stick with us as Speaking Up continues this effort!

During this week, Speaking Up For Us also hit a major milestone: the number of women we’ve profiled is now greater than the number of women Google Doodles have honored or recognized. Over the first half of 2012, we’ve responded to each of the 16 male-focused Doodles posted in the U.S.; we’ve nominated Doodle-worthy women; and, of course, many of the posts that were part of the milestone series focused on Doodle-worthy women, too.

When you count up every birthday Doodle they’ve ever posted in any country around the world, you get a list that includes only 36 female Doodle honorees (representing about 12.5% of all Doodles). In total, Speaking Up has highlighted, just in the last six months, more women than Google Doodles have ever recognized. So while Google may be promoting the absurd notion that, throughout all of history, only 36 women have made a mark on the world, we’re absolutely demolishing that idea.

We’ve shown that the pool of amazing, talented, creative and innovative women goes much deeper than Doodles have been acknowledging — and we’re just getting started.

Midpoint Series: Doodle-Worthy Women of June

This Speaking Up post is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

Just like in April and May, I want to close out this month — and the 2012 Midpoint Series — by highlighting some of the Doodle-Worthy Women born in June. Since this has been such a special week here at Speaking Up, I’m going to super-size this month’s edition and look at six amazing, inspiring women who haven’t been recognized by Doodles – yet.

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Midpoint Series: Katie Bethea on Joanne Simpson

This guest post from Katie Lorentz Bethea is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

Hurricane season in the Atlantic Ocean runs from June 1 to November 30, the perfect time for a Google Doodle honoring Joanne Simpson, an amazing female meteorologist and hurricane hunter.

Joanne Gerould was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on March 23, 1923. Clouds fascinated her as a child while sailing off the coast of Cape Cod. She was known to be quite tenacious and an avid adventurer – sailing, flying, hiking, diving and more. In college, she became a student pilot at the University of Chicago, which led her into the field of meteorology, eventually becoming the first woman to receive a Ph.D. in that field.

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Midpoint Series: When Doodles Get It Right – Past Female Doodle Honorees

This Speaking Up post is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

Only 6 women have been honored with a Doodle in 2012, and none of those have been shown in the United States. But Google has honored a total of 36 women between 2008 and today. It would take significantly more than a single blog post to learn about all of these women, so today I’m going to highlight a few that piqued my interest.

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Midpoint Series: Kelley Hess on Georgia O’Keeffe

This guest post from Kelley Hess is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

Georgia O’Keeffe, born November 15, 1887, was an American painter famous for her large close-ups of flowers, and sweeping city-, land-, and skyscapes. I was introduced to her paintings at a young age by my mom. In the intervening 20-odd years, life has taken me to a number of places that were also important in her life. But it wasn’t until this last year that I made the pilgrimage to the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico and gained an even greater appreciation for her longevity and for the iconography of her work.

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Midpoint Series: Samantha DeMart on Eleanor Roosevelt

This guest post from Samantha DeMart is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

Born on October 11, 1884, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was destined, most thought, for a life suited to wealthy women of that time: schooling by the best private tutors and fancy schools abroad in Europe; marriage to a suitable man; a social calendar filled with parties; a home filled with children. Eleanor, however, had other plans. Through some atypical travel opportunities in her high school years, she was exposed to poverty and the experiences of the working class, which would greatly shape the activism in her later life.

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Midpoint Series: Sarah Scoles on Doodles + Communicating Science to the Public: The Bigger Picture

This guest post from Sarah Scoles is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

My name is Sarah Scoles, and I work in science education and science communication. The goal of my job at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, WV, is to create experiences and content that help students and the general public connect to science and engineering. At the observatory, we work to change science education to be more inquiry-based, we work to make scientific results more accessible to everyone, and we work to show the public who scientists are and what they do.

But science education, in general, is fact- and memorization-based, scientific results are often both hard to find and hard to understand, and in 2011 66% of Americans said that they could not name one living scientist (and of those who could, 15% named Stephen Hawking) (Your Congress, Your Health Public Opinion Poll, 2011).
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Midpoint Series: When Doodles Get It Right – Women Honored Around the Globe in 2012

This Speaking Up post is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

In March, Speaking Up celebrated International Women’s Day by taking a look at the women around the world who had been honored with Doodles in 2012. As part of the Midpoint Series, I wanted to update this to include all the women who have had Doodles since March. Unfortunately, there haven’t been any such Doodles shown in the United States, and only two additional women have been recognized with a Doodle elsewhere in the world — both in Australia, incidentally. Let’s learn more about these two outstanding women!

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Midpoint Series: Ann Hoang on Annie Easley

This guest post from Ann Hoang is part of the 2012 Midpoint Series. See all of the posts in the series here.

Annie Easley, born April 23, 1933, was an American mathematician, rocket scientist, and one of the first African-American computer scientists. Over the course of her 34-year career she supported the Centaur rocket project and developed and implemented computer systems to analyze alternative power and energy technologies.

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